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The Blanton

blantonmuseum:

Bringing art to your phones since August of ‘14. Add us and say hi!

If you’re wondering why I asked y’all about Snapchat the other month, this is why.

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blantonmuseum:

Can you guys help me pick a filter? I don’t know if I should go with XX Pro or Valencia. I wanna look tan. #selfie #statueselfie #blantonmuseum (at The Blanton Museum of Art)

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Mickalene ThomasClarivel #2, 2014

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Mickalene ThomasMonet’s Kitchen, 2014

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Mickalene ThomasUntitled #1, 2014 

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Mickalene ThomasHong Kong Landscape, 2013

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Mickalene ThomasCourbet 4 (Marie: Centered), 2011

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Mickalene ThomasShow Me What You Got, 2011

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Mickalene ThomasThree Graces: Les Trois Femmes Noires, 2011

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Mickalene Thomas, Left Behind, 2010

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Mickalene ThomasPortrait of Mama Bush 1, 2010

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Mickalene ThomasShe Ain’t a Child No More, 2010

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Mickalene Thomas, Sleep: Deux Femmes Noires, 2012

From the Brooklyn Museum:

Thomas transforms Gustave Courbet’s 1866 painting Le Sommeil (Sleep), an interior scene of two nude Caucasian women. Restaging the piece in nature, she depicts two African American women reclining on richly patterned textiles. The contrast between their black and yellow skin tones echoes that between the dark- and fair-haired subjects in Courbet’s painting, while Thomas’s deliberate use of French in her title simultaneously pays tribute to a lineage of Western art history and revises that tradition. As is characteristic of Thomas’s recent work, the surface of the painting is fragmented into a number of angular pieces, drawing attention to the painting as an artful construction rather than a seamless representation of the world around us. Thomas has commented that the panel is based on landscapes by the contemporary British artist David Hockney, suggesting the eclectic nature of her sources of inspiration.

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Mickalene Thomas, Portrait of Mnonja, 2010

From the Smithsonian American Art Museum:

Over the last ten years, Mickalene Thomas has become known for large-scale paintings of American women provocatively posed against boldly patterned backgrounds adorned with rhinestones. Her work explores notions of beauty, sexuality and black female identity. Thomas’s use of rhinestones and vivid textile patterns adds an even greater sense of drama and sensuality to her paintings. She is one of many contemporary artists experimenting with non-traditional materials, particularly glitter and sequins. For Thomas, the rhinestones evoke folk art traditions and Haitian voodoo art. They also serve as a metaphor for female beauty products, which can both enhance and mask a woman’s identity.

Thomas’s work stems from her study of art history and the classical genres of portraiture, landscape, and still life, and is inspired by a wide range of sources, from Hudson River School landscapes to Henri Matisse’s nudes and Romare Bearden’s collages. Although her paintings often reference the familiar compositional arrangements of odalisque paintings, Thomas imbues her subjects with an agency and action seldom seen in the canon of figurative painting. Portrait of Mnonja is a stunning example of Thomas’s recent work. The reclining figure is posed in a sassy contrapposto and situated against a wood-paneled background redolent of a seventies-era living room. She wears a loose-fitting white blouse with a plunging neckline, and her hair is pulled back in a low bun. Her right hand rests on her knee, revealing nail polish that matches her audacious pink heels. She exudes dignity and self-assurance.

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