Giorgione, The Sunset, c. 1506-10

From the National Gallery in London:

It has been proposed that the foreground figures shown in this picture are Saint Roch and his attendant Gothardus, who tended the ulcer on Saint Roch’s thigh. If this is the case, the picture may have been painted to commemorate relief from the plague, against which Saint Roch was invoked in the Veneto in 1504. At the extreme right Saint Anthony peers from his cave. In the right middle ground Saint George is shown on a rearing horse attacking a dragon. This part of the painting is, however, almost entirely the work of a mid-20th-century restorer.

 

Posted on January 7 2012, with 41 Notes

  1. palaiologoi reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  2. red-death-dreams reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  3. mokshaa reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  4. contrastthefinearts reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  5. cathyboy reblogged this from cavetocanvas and added:
    I’m really excited by the comparison of this painting with a page from my book Going Back: An explanation of the...
  6. oleanda-yolling reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  7. varangoi reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  8. yzerman reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  9. cavetocanvas posted this