Anthony van Dyck, Triple Portrait of Charles I, 1635

In this portrait of King Charles I of England, van Dyck depicts the king from three different angles; this shows off van Dyck’s ability to render a face in various poses. This painting was sent to the virtuoso sculptor Bernini, who was commissioned to create a bust of the king: the sculptor needed to know what Charles looked like from various angles. By using van Dyck and Bernini, Charles was actively seeking out renowned artists, creating a competition among the English nobility to see who could get the most famous artist to paint or sculpt their portrait.

 

Posted on February 16 2012, with 92 Notes

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    De mis pinturas favoritas
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    He said he’d never seen a sadder face.