It’s back.

I know I’ve been very absent from here as of late, but there’s no way I could let another AP Art History exam pass us by without my annual review. I’ll be reblogging the entire review starting Friday, though Saturday, and ending Sunday to help test takers. 

Make sure to check out my tips and tricks for the exam before this weekend. There will be study questions included on many of the posts, but it’s also helpful to use the CtC homepage as a set of flashcards, since the artist, title, and date won’t appear until you mouse over the post.

Good luck!

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arthistorygifs:

The Temptation of St Anthony - Salvador Dalí

This tumblr turns famous artworks into gifs to explain/provide meaning into the painting. Not too many up yet, but the concept is awesome.

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The AP Art History Crash Course is over, but for me it really highlighted a larger problem with teaching canonical art history. Head over to twitter to join the conversation - I’d love to hear your thoughts.

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Barbara Kruger, Untitled (“I shop therefore I am”) 1987

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Cindy Sherman, Untitled Film Still #21, 1978

Things to think about when studying:

  • How was Sherman trying to reclaim the male gaze?
  • How does Sherman play with identity in these untitled film stills? What aesthetic is she trying to evoke?

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Donald Judd, Untitled, 1973

Things to keep in mind while studying:

  • This sculpture is an example of what movement?
  • How does the highly polished surface help with Judd’s elimination of the hand of the artist? This was a reaction to what style?

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Robert Smithson, Spiral Jetty, 1970. Located in Great Salt Lake, Utah, United States.

Things to keep in mind while studying:

  • This work is part of what movement?
  • Why is location so important? How does Smithson use the specific site to create the work?
  • How does the viewer play a role? Why is his or her involvement important?

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Claes Oldenburg, Soft Toilet, 1966

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Joseph Beuys, How to Explain Pictures to a Dead Hare, 1965

One of the artist’s most famous performances, Beuys covered his head first with honey, and then with fifty dollars worth of gold leaf. He cradles a dead hare in his arms, and strapped an iron plate to the bottom of his right shoe. Viewed from behind glass in the gallery, the audience could see Beuys walking from drawing to drawing, quietly whispering in the dead rabbit’s ear. As he walked around the room, the silence was pierced by intermittent sound of his footsteps; the loud crack of the iron on the floor, and the soundless whisper of the sole of shoe. (via)

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Norman Rockwell, The Problem We All Live With, 1964

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Roy Lichtenstein, Drowning Girl, 1963

Things to think about when studying:

  • What were the dots that Lichtenstein used called?
  • What movement is this work from?
  • How does Lichtenstein alter his popular sources to create a work of art rather than a direct copy?

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Andy Warhol, Gold Marilyn Monroe, 1962

Things to think about when studying:

  • This is a silkscreen - why is this medium important to Warhol’s work?
  • How does Warhol undermine the public’s perception of Marilyn?
  • What does this work say about consumerism?

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Diane Arbus, Child with Toy Hand Grenade, 1962

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Jasper Johns, Three Flags, 1958

  • What materials did Johns use in his flag paintings?
  • What was he trying to achieve by representing such a common symbol?

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Willem de Kooning, Woman I, 1952

Things to keep in mind while studying:

  • How large was this painting? Why is that important to the Abstract Expressionist movement?
  • Stylistically, how does de Kooning depict the woman? Be able to describe his brushwork and other formal qualities.

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