Untitled - Cy Twombly, 2001

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The Four Seasons: Summer - Cy Twombly, 1994

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Summer Madness - Cy Twombly, 1990

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Wilder Shores of Love - Cy Twombly, 1985

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Untitled - Cy Twombly, 1970

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Untitled - Cy Twombly, 1970

From MoMA’s website:

Twombly is a key member of the generation of American artists immediately following the Abstract Expressionists. Between 1967 and 1971 he produced a number of works on gray grounds. The largest in the series, this monumental painting features terse, colorless scrawls, reminiscent of chalk on a blackboard, that form no actual words. Twombly made this work using an unusual technique: he sat on the shoulders of a friend, who shuttled back and forth along the length of the canvas, thus allowing the artist to create his fluid, continuous lines.

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Untitled - Cy Twombly, 1968

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Untitled - Cy Twombly, 1968

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Leda and the Swan - Cy Twombly, 1962

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Rome - Cy Twombly, 1962

From MoMA’s website:

Rome, Twombly’s home since the 1950s, has nurtured his fascination with classical antiquity. In this work he refers to the Roman myth in which Jupiter, lord of the gods, takes the shape of a swan in order to ravish Leda, the beautiful mother of Helen (over whom the Trojan war would be fought). Twombly’s version of this old art-historical theme supplies no contrast of feathers and flesh but a fusion of violent energies in furiously thrashing overlays of crayon, pencil, and ruddy paint. A few recognizable signs—hearts, a phallus—fly out from this explosion, in stark contrast to the sober windowlike rectangle near the top of the painting.

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Bay of Naples - Cy Twombly, 1961

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The Italians - Cy Twombly, January 1961

From MoMA’s website:

Wild, scribbled, graffiti–like marks energize the expansive white surface of The Italians, revealing the artist’s sensuous joy in manipulating his medium. The explosion of signs, ironically, is not without order or clarity: the rubbing of charcoal on the far left side of the canvas reveals the stretcher bar beneath it, a red heart can be seen at the bottom, and “roma” is written just beneath the artist’s signature at the top right.

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Blue Room - Cy Twombly, 1957

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Academy - Cy Twombly, 1955

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